Cards, comics and games. Oh my!

Published on: Thu, Jan 15, 2015

Spidey

Trading cards, comic books and board games bring generations together.

Story by Alex Gustafson
Denton Live Spring-Summer 2015

A tall blonde-haired figure in a green hood tenses as he prepares for his nightly patrol. He steps onto a ledge overlooking the city and thinks of the training that led to this moment. He remembers the promise he made to his father to protect the city he calls his own. The masked vigilante known as the “Arrow,” will not fail his city. What he doesn’t realize is that he is a cardboard cutout and his “city” is a comic book store.

More Fun Comics and Games was founded in 2003 by Tim Stoltzfus and Keith Colvin. First known as Treasure Aisles, the store was placed under the More Fun family umbrella when it moved from Fry to Hickory Street. The store has been at its current location on the square since December 2008.

Batman and Harley Quinn themed key chains and POP! Vinyl figurines featuring the likenesses of Star Wars characters and the Dark Knight Trilogy line the shelves at More Fun Comics and Games. Card and board games are also common finds at the store, including classics like RISK and re-imagined oldies, such as Big Bang Theory themed Monopoly.

From child novices to teen and middle-aged gurus, the experience levels of patrons vary. But everyone comes here for a common reason: to let his or her inner nerd roar. Employee Cat Hickman enjoys introducing people to new things and says that is the highlight of her job.

The store has a Game Center, located at 316 East Hickory St. The center has been in existence for a year with a capacity of 62 (58 patrons and four employees). Initially, the store was located in Lancaster but moved to Denton, because founder Tim Stoltzfus believed that Denton had more potential with the city’s two universities and nearly 50,000 students.

More Fun Game Center buys, sells and trades trading cards, board games and miniatures. Items on the shelves include a Lord of the Rings Dice Building Game, Star Wars and Magic the Gathering game miniatures.

Manager Jarrad Taulman says the center focuses more on “hobby” portions of games like miniature making and deck building games.

It is a place for tournaments, game days and people to play Dungeons and Dragons, a game that really popularized miniature making. Jarrad says the center is considered the back room of the comic shop on the square, where people come to take their gaming to the next level and find new cards and miniatures to add to their collections.

The venue hosts one or two events every day, seven days a week, featuring a Press Ganger who teaches gaming novices and newbies the ropes of games that they are interested in. They also bring promotional materials to the center such as posters featuring lists of the center’s schedule and upcoming events plus descriptions of prizes to be awarded winners in center tournaments and events.

The store was founded for people to get involved with a particular game, customize it and make it their own. “This isn’t the era of the basement dwelling gamer,” Jarrad says. “My goal when I run events here is for people who never played before to feel welcome, have fun and keep coming back.”

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