Postal

Work. For most of us, we spend 40 hours a week in the company of a group of individuals, whether we like them or not. If you’re lucky, your co-workers become your “work family” and spending time with them isn’t a chore. For Cadina Wilson, a new employee of the United States Postal Service, her co-workers went above and beyond to give her plenty of drama fodder in the short film Postal, by Peter McNeil.

Postal posterWilson asks herself at the beginning of the film, “am I where I should be in life?” She particularly asks this question after being fired from her job as a chef and being forced to take a job sorting and delivering mail for the post office. She soon finds herself collecting secrets from the various characters that work alongside her. She dates a co-worker, a single father who is seeking custody of his daughter, while being pursued by another co-worker who is seeking a management position.

When mail tampering is suspected, Cadina begins to eye her co-workers with suspicions, trying to sift through what she knows about each one of her new colleagues to figure out who might be the guilty party, in hopes of shifting any suspicion off of herself. But when those in the office each jump to their own conclusions over who said what, things get messy.

This intense, but at times light-hearted, look at workplace drama will stay with you long past leaving the theater. It also goes to show that even the job that you think is just for now can influence the entire trajectory of your life.

See the trailer here:

Postal runs 29 minutes and will be shown Friday, January 27 at 5:15 p.m. during Film Block 3 with other shorts Reel Inspiration, Bus Stop, The Example and The Letter Carrier as part of Denton Black Film Festival. To purchase tickets at the online box office, click here.

 

The Letter Carrier

What’s a family hiding in the backwoods of Virginia to do when hiding from those who want to enslave them? Why, turn their little one-room cabin into a hall of harmonies, of course. This story of a family who was making their own little life far away from the horrors of the Civil War made due by raising their voices when life got rough. And when their livelihood was threatened by the outside world, they took matters into their own hands, first by force, then by song.

The Letter Carrier posterFor a plot so intense, this short has quite a bit of lovely singing in it. That should come as no surprise, as the director and screenwriter is Broadway veteran Jesse L. Martin (whom most of the audience probably knows from his long stint on Law & Order).

The Letter Carrier showcases a family who was in hiding without seeming like they lived in fear. They had their ways of making their life work during a time that oppression was rampant throughout the country and especially in Virginia. If for no other reason, see this film for the beautiful music showcased throughout. You won’t regret it.

See the trailer here:

The Letter Carrier runs 18 minutes and will be shown Friday, January 27 at 5:15 p.m. during Film Block 3 with other shorts Reel Inspiration, Bus Stop, The Example and Postal as part of Denton Black Film Festival. To purchase tickets at the online box office, click here.

  

On Time

There are choices we all make in life. Should I buy that pair of pants I saw at Target? What should I make for dinner tonight? Most of the time, our choices are trivial, but sometimes, a hard decision turns out to be a disastrous choice.

On Time posterIn the short film On Time, Renee Johnson is a single mother, unemployed and living in her van with her young daughter. She finally gets the call she’s been waiting for – a great job that is perfectly suited to her resume! However, on the day of the interview, Renee cannot find anyone to watch her child and decides to leave her in the car during her interview.

This eight-minute short is just a part of Renee’s entire story, which takes her from losing her child to protective services to getting her back after getting her life on track. We’ve all made that choice that turned out to be the wrong one. So go and see for yourself: when faced with the prospect of getting back on course or possibly losing your child for good, which decision would you make?

See the trailer here:

On Time runs 8 minutes and will be shown Friday, January 27 at 1 p.m. during Film Block 1 with other college student shorts Cream; Sterile; Two Scoops; Ball is Life; Reach; Same Fruit, Different Tree and Trouble Man as part of Denton Black Film Festival. To purchase tickets at the online box office, click here.